Are Some Of Trump's New York City Buildings A Mirage?

54 minutes ago

Donald Trump got his start in real estate and over the years he's owned and sold many of New York City's great buildings, including the Plaza Hotel and the St. Moritz.

His image as a developer endures, even though these days, Trump's real estate holdings are surprisingly sparse.

Ever since his presidential campaign took off, the Trump buildings have become full-blown New York City tourist attractions.

Tour guide Ned Callon recently led a group of French and Chinese tourists as they snapped selfies beneath an oversized gold "TRUMP" sign at 40 Wall Street.

Though they were not victorious in Sunday's Little League World Series title game, the Red Land Little League Team received a hero's welcome from fans in Lewisberry, Pa., Sunday night.

They lined the streets, cheered and waved signs for a team that still owns the bragging rights to the title "United States champions," which they won on Saturday. But the next day, Red Land came up short in a tension-filled Little League World Series title game — jumping out to an eight-run lead but ultimately losing 18-11 to Japan.

Neurologist Oliver Sacks, who died Sunday, once described himself as an "old Jewish atheist," but during the decades he spent studying the human brain, he sometimes found himself recording experiences that he likened to a godly cosmic force.

Such was the case once when Sacks tried marijuana in the 1960s: He was looking at his hand, and it appeared to be retreating from him, yet getting larger and larger.

Watching Mitski perform at my desk, there are moments when I was worried for her. In her opening song, "Townie," the boys "are driving and they'll be drinking" — and a verse later, Mitski sings of love in ways that feel vengeful, not fruitful.

And I want a love that falls as fast

As a body from the balcony, and

I want a kiss like my heart is hitting the ground

I'm holding my breath with a baseball bat

Though I don't know what I'm waiting for

A longtime federal judge struggled Monday over what constitutes justice for members of one of Washington, D.C.'s most notorious drug rings.

Senior U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth pressed a public defender about the fate of Melvin Butler, a man who helped flood the city with cocaine that contributed to waves of violence in the late 1980s.

"You're saying that I can't consider the fact that he was one of the biggest drug dealers in the history of our city?" the judge asked. "Congress has tied my hands and I can't consider that?"

After a last-ditch effort to reach a settlement in the legal dispute over the NFL's four-game suspension of quarterback Tom Brady, a federal judge says he'll issue his ruling on Brady's appeal on either Tuesday or Wednesday.

On Monday morning, Brady and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell attended discussions about a possible settlement. But after it became clear that the two sides don't intend to give ground, District Judge Richard Berman held a brief hearing to announce that he'll rule on the case early this week.

Police in Thailand are looking for two new suspects, a woman and a man, in connection with a bombing in Bangkok that left 20 dead.

Michael Sullivan filed this report from Thailand for Newscast:

Will Smith from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air was my first American friend. Ours was an unlikely friendship: a shy Indian kid, fresh off the boat, with big glasses and a thick accent, and a high school b-ball player from West Philadelphia, chillin' out maxin' and relaxin' all cool. And yet, I was with Will all the way, unnerved when he accidentally gave Carlton speed, shaken when he got shot in Season 5, and deeply embarrassed every time he wiped out in front of Veronica.

Larry Doby, 1953
Bowman Gum [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

  Camden native Larry Doby was the first African American to play Major League Baseball in the American League, joining the Cleveland Indians on July 5, 1947, just 11 weeks after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in the National League with the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Indians recently honored Doby with a statue outside Progressive Stadium in Cleveland. Camden is justifiably proud of Doby – who was the first black player on a World Series Championship team – as is evidenced by the comments of Camden Archives and Museum Director Catherine Richardson and Tom Didato, sports editor with the Camden Chronicle Independent.


Justin Kauflin on Song Travels

6 hours ago
Justin Kauflin
VSA International

  Jazz pianist Justin Kauflin attended William Paterson University, where he formed a friendship with his mentor, the late Clark Terry. Justin, who lost his vision at age 11, connected with the trumpeter, who was dealing with his own vision loss. Their journey together was chronicled in the documentary Keep On Keepin’ On. He went on to work with Quincy Jones, and his 2015 album, Dedication, topped the jazz charts. This week, Kauflin remembers his mentor with “For Clark.”

---Sunday, Sep 6 on our News Stations at 2 pm | Classical Stations at 6 pm---

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