Disaster Help Information

As South Carolinians assess rain and flood damage, and look for help in recovery, you may find these phone numbers and web links useful.

An iconic luxury ocean liner, originally designed and built in 1952 to be the fastest ship on the seas and a symbol of America's post-war strength and pride, may soon be reduced to scraps of metal.

North Charleston, S.C., has reached a settlement with the family of an unarmed black man shot in the back and killed by a white police officer in April

It probably won't surprise you that there's a growing polarization among Americans over how to deal with several immigration policy proposals.

Whether it's Donald Trump's idea for a massive border fence or the proposal to change the Constitution so that babies of unauthorized residents aren't automatically made citizens, Republicans and Democrats are hardening their views, according to a new national survey issued by the Washington, D.C.-based Pew Research Center.

The nail in the coffin of House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy's hopes of being the next speaker was opposition from the House Freedom Caucus. The rogue conservative group of about 30 members instead wants it to be Florida Rep. Daniel Webster.

But Webster might not even be coming back to the House in 2017, thanks to a redrawing of his congressional district that might make it unwinnable for the GOP.

As people are digging out from the effects of the state’s historic floods and keeping an eye out for what’s next, they may not be aware of the storm’s effects on another phase of South Carolina life:  its wildlife.  Naturalist Rudy Mancke and Congaree National Park Ranger Jon Manchester discuss the flood’s effects on the state’s animals, and plants.  They both agree that any harmful effects can likely be overcome by nature, and Manchester gives a slant not considered by most:  how a flood, which is considered a disaster by humans, can actually benefit a swamp environment like Congaree Park.

How many emotions does a human experience? Dozens? Hundreds? Thousands? Maybe it depends on the language you speak?

"Man, in New Orleans we really are fortunate — we got some of the best things in the world," Chef Paul Prudhomme once said. "And one of those things is the mufaletta sandwich."

And one of the best things about New Orleans was Prudhomme himself.

He was known for introducing blackened redfish to the rest of us, for his cooking demos and for his line of magic spices. Needless to say, Prudhomme changed the way the world saw Louisiana cooking.

He has died at the age of 75.

Amazon is firing yet another shot at a competitor. This time it's a mega-artisanal shot, at Etsy — the popular craft site. The e-commerce giant on Thursday launched Handmade, a new marketplace for, well, handmade goods. This could be wonderful news for the artisan movement, or terrible news for Etsy, its staunchest supporter to date.

Valerie Nethery got a message out of the blue, from Amazon. "They emailed me directly. I'm not sure how they found me."

The Nobel Prize has a special aura. Winning one instantly certifies you as someone who has reached the pinnacle of science.

But what does it take to win the prize? And what does it do to your life? There are different answers for every scientist, of course. But for Nobel laureate and chemist Harold "Harry" Kroto, some of the answers might surprise you.

"I've always felt that the Nobel Prize gives me nothing as far as science is concerned," Kroto told me when I visited him earlier this year in Tallahassee, Fla.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


Flood Damage Assessment Continues, Flooding Threatens Lowcountry

Officials warn that flooding near several Lowcountry rivers may last for days.

Walter Edgar's Journal

Harper Lee being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, November 5, 2007.
White House photo by Eric Draper via Wikimedia Commons

How Does Harper Lee's "Go Set a Watchman" inform "Mockingbird"?

Dr. Robert Brinkmeyer, Director of the Institute of Southern Studies at the University of South Carolina, talks with Walter Edgar about Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchmen (Harper Collins, 2015), as well as To Kill a Mockingbird and its place in Southern literature. Walter Edgar's JournalAll Stations: Fri, Oct 9, 12 pmNews Stations: Sun, Oct 11, 4 pm
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