This is one in a series of essays running last week and this week about the state of television in 2015. The series is based on developments at the recent Television Critics Association press tour in Beverly Hills, Calif., where broadcast and cable networks, along with streaming services like Netflix, presented new and existing shows to TV critics and reporters. The entire series is available here.

It was just after sunset on a muggy Friday evening earlier this month, and my wife and I were standing outside a Hardee's in Seneca, South Carolina. We were at a vigil for Zachary Hammond, a white teenager killed by a police officer during an attempted drug arrest in the restaurant's parking lot, three miles from where we live and teach at Clemson University.

Teenagers often feel bound by their parents' rules, and many young people feel isolated at some point, separated from the rest of the world.

But what would life be like for a young woman who was literally isolated — and bound by rules designed to save her life?

It's a question that author Nicola Yoon explores in her new novel for young adults, Everything, Everything. For 18 years, her lead character, Madeleine, has been kept inside a sterile house, interacting only with her mother and her nurse.

From African drums in Congo Square to raucous brass bands second-lining in the streets, jazz is the soundtrack of New Orleans. The history and spirit of the Crescent City can be summoned through thousands of now-classic songs.

The California condor is big. In fact, it's the largest flying bird in North America with a wingspan of 9 1/2 feet.

Michael Mace, curator of birds for the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, tells NPR's Arun Rath that the condor "is like the 747 compared to a Cessna if you look at it proportionally with other species like eagles and turkey vultures."

Mace works in a condor power line aversion training program at the zoo. It was developed to address the condors' unfortunate run-ins with power lines.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 American Homefront Project. To see more, visit .

Richard Engel, NBC's chief foreign correspondent, talks with NPR's Arun Rath about his reporting on the Islamic State's brutal tactics to recruit the next generation of their fighting force.

Chinese authorities have arrested 197 people who are accused of spreading rumors on social media about the recent stock market crash and the deadly explosion at Tianjin earlier this month.

Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley announced on Sunday that he will support the White House-backed nuclear deal with Iran.

Merkley becomes the 31st Senate Democrat to endorse the agreement publicly, leaving the Obama administration just three votes shy of having enough votes to sustain a veto of a congressional resolution of disapproval — that is, of being able to advance the deal over Republican objections.

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Walter Edgar's Journal

Conversation on the Civil War: William Tecumseh Sherman, Amercian

Dr. Wm. Marszalek talks with Dr. Walter Edgar about Sherman as a commander who came to abhor the senseless slaughter of the War, and who sought a different strategy to bring the South to surrender.

What's Playing on our Classical Stations

What's Playing on our News Stations

Classical Music from ETV Radio.

Weekdays from 11:00 to noon, host Kate McKinney brings you great classical music, old and new, and keeps you up to date with the latest weather forecast.

The South Carolina Business Review

Monday -Friday, 7:51 AM -- The South Carolina Business Review offers news from the state's businesses, nonprofits, and small business support organizations.