A police officer was shot and killed in a suburb north of Chicago this morning, and local and federal authorities are conducting a manhunt for three suspects.

The officer radioed to dispatchers that he was going to check on suspicious activity around 8 a.m. local time in the city of Fox Lake, Lake County sheriff's office spokesman Christopher Covelli said at a news conference. The officer, who has not yet been identified, then said he was in a "foot pursuit," before losing contact.

Taylor Swift Is Dreaming Of A Very White Africa

17 minutes ago

The video for American singer Taylor Swift's new song "Wildest Dreams" has been viewed more than ten million times in the two days since it debuted.

The video was shot in Africa and California.

The Islamist militant group al-Shabab ambushed a base for African Union peacekeepers in southern Somalia early Tuesday.

The base, some 60 miles south of the Somali capital Mogadishu, is the second to be attacked this summer by the al-Qaida-linked militant group, NPR's Gregory Warner tells our Newscast unit. He says it raises questions about the success of the eight-year peacekeeping mission.

Trying to divine what the future holds is an ancient human preoccupation. And for centuries, soothsayers have sought answers in the bottom of a teacup.

Amy Taylor was 18 when she stumbled into the practice of reading tea leaves. Now 46 and a professional tea-leaf reader, she remembers looking into her stepsister's teacup at a Toronto restaurant, and saying, "Oh, that's funny, that looks like a tree." She says she looked at all of her family's cups that night, and saw things in all of them. "I just thought that was really odd," she says.

Ever since the U.S. and its partners finalized the nuclear deal with Iran in July, Secretary of State John Kerry has tried to downplay what diplomats call the possible military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program.

"We're not fixated on Iran specifically accounting for what they did at one point in time or another. We know what they did," Kerry said this summer. "We have absolute knowledge with respect to the certain military activities they were engaged in. What we're concerned about is going forward."

The auditorium lights were low as the high school students filed in — and I was on the stage with the teachers who led the school's honor society.

My job was to give a short speech to the new inductees whose grades and activities earned them their place in the auditorium. There were notes for the speech in my pocket but when the teacher lit a candle on the table with the student's certificates, I felt something shift.

For novelist Jonathan Franzen, writing isn't just an escape from himself, it's an "escape from everything." He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "It's like having this dream that you can go back to, kind of on demand. When it's really going well ... you're in a fantasy land and feeling no pain."

Lawyers representing thousands of inmates who have been held in small, windowless rooms say they’ve reached a settlement with the state of California to end the practice of extreme long-term isolation. Michael Montgomery talks with Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins about the history of solitary confinement in California and what is going to change.

Flying presents a particular set of challenges for people with allergies to peanuts and tree nuts. Even touching an armrest with residue on it can cause someone with an allergy to go into anaphylactic shock, where the airway closes and the person is unable to breathe.

People who use Google’s internet browser Chrome could soon see fewer of those ads that pop up or start playing automatically. Starting today, Chrome will block online ads that use Adobe Flash. Flash is the technology behind many of the online video and banner ads that pop up or start playing on their own.

Now the ads will be defaulted to pause on Chrone, so users will have to elect to watch them. Jason Bellini of The Wall Street Journal joins Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins to take a look at what this means for Adobe Flash and for online advertising.

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Walter Edgar's Journal

Hub City Marks 20 Years with Award Winning Novelist

Betsy Teter of the Hub City Writer's Project and Best Novel winner James McTeer II talk with Walter Edgar about twenty years of Hub City, and the novel "Minnow."

What's Playing on our Classical Stations

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Classical Music from SC Public Radio.

Weekdays from 11:00 to noon, host Kate McKinney brings you great classical music, old and new, and keeps you up to date with the latest weather forecast.

The South Carolina Business Review

Monday -Friday, 7:51 AM -- The South Carolina Business Review offers news from the state's businesses, nonprofits, and small business support organizations.