On November 30, delegates from nearly 200 nations are scheduled to arrive in Paris to negotiate a new agreement to curb global warming.

The first such meeting took place 18 years ago in Kyoto, Japan — a conference that produced the first international treaty aimed at slowing climate change. That attempt failed.

The University of Chicago is canceling all classes and other events on its main campus Monday over online threats of gun violence.

FBI counterterrorism officials alerted the school on Sunday, the university said in a statement. They warned of online threats from an "unknown individual" that specifically mentioned a location, the campus quad, and a time, 10 a.m.

It started as a little tree, barely the height of an eager toddler hyped up on holiday treats, more than 90 years ago.

Now, it's all grown up — 74 feet, to be exact — and has made it to the big leagues: Washington, D.C.

A Christmas tree in the capitol is nothing new. The tradition began in 1964, when then-House Speaker John McCormack (D-Mass.) proposed planting a tree on the Capitol Grounds. The Forest Service took ownership of the project in 1970.

On December 1, 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on bus in Montgomery, Ala. — and changed the course of history.

Her action sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which would eventually lead to the end of legally segregated public transportation.

And for many Americans, Parks is the civil rights icon they love to love: the unassuming seamstress who, supposedly, just got tired one day and unwittingly launched the modern civil rights movement.

The two civilians killed in a shooting at a Planned Parenthood clinic Friday were Ke'Arre Stewart, a father of two and Army veteran who served in Iraq, and Jennifer Markovsky, a mother of two who was reportedly at the clinic to support a friend.

Today I was thinking about something one of the Freedom Riders told me a few years ago, when I had the opportunity — the privilege — to interview a group of them. Remember, these were the courageous men and women, both black and white, who rode the Southern bus routes for seven months in 1961 — facing vicious beatings, fire bombs, arrests and jail — all to draw attention to the fact that public facilities were still segregated despite the passage of laws saying it should be otherwise.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


MICHEL MARTIN: One of the casualties of the drought that may not come to mind immediately - the California soundscape. Bernie Krause is one person who appreciates these sounds. He's a soundscape ecologist.


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At Home - Charleston

(Originally broadcast 05/08/15 - In Catherine H. Forrester’s At Home-Charleston (Wimmer Cookbooks, 2006), the historic Thomas Rose House serves as the stunning backdrop to the intriguing tales of Forrester’s grandmother Juliette Wiles Staats’ entertaining and the distinctive social traditions of one of America’s most celebrated cities. Gathering lively tidbits from Staats’ meticulous records—handwritten file cards, detailed party books and hand bound journals, Forrester leads readers into the peninsula’s private world of elegant entertaining. Cathy Forrester talks with Dr. Edgar about the book, her family, and life in Charleston. All Stations: Fri, Nov 27, 12 pm | News Stations: Sun, Nov 29, 4 pm
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